“Earthrise” from the Moon, Animated

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enhanced-buzz-12895-1387559396-10Back on this day in 1968, Apollo 8 and her crew made history by becoming the first manned space mission to orbit the moon. The world watch enthralled as Cmdr. Frank Borman relayed the crew’s Christmas greetings to Earth. Another iconic (literally) moment was the capture of this photo, which came to define an entire new–there’s just no other way to say it–worldview.

Now,  someone has assembled a series of these photos taken from the Apollo spacecraft into a surprisingly smooth animation of Earthrise over the lunar surface. From Buzzfeed:

You may have seen this photo before. Taken in 1968, by an Apollo 8 astronaut, it is commonly referred to as “Earthrise.”

From the moon’s surface, the Earth doesn’t technically “rise,” since the same side of the moon always faces Earth. The view of Earth would not substantially change from any point on the moon’s surface. This shot, and others like it, were taken from orbit — the “rise” comes from the trajectory of the spacecraft.

So, what happens when you stitch a whole series of Earthrise photos together?

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What A Full “Earthrise” Looks Like From The Moon.

Reddit user Notbrit produced this incredibly smooth animation from a collection of sequential shots. The motion, again, is caused by the changing perspective of the orbiter, not rotation of the Moon. But still: incredible. Here’s the original animation, pre-stabilization:

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Anyway, there you are. That’s you! You and everyone you love and everyone you hate. Have a nice day.

This entry was posted in Astronomy, DIY, General Interest, History of Science, Observation, Optics, Photography, Space. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to “Earthrise” from the Moon, Animated

  1. I remember this and It was a Christmas card for that year. It was like a religious experience to see earth from another body. There we were all of us.

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